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Pineapples, Peaches, and Pears, OH MY! Avoiding the Hazard of Mindless Produce Purchasing

Posted by: | Posted on: July 17, 2019
Pineapples, Peaches, and Pears, OH MY! Avoiding the Hazard of Mindless Produce Purchasing

Local food, as defined by the US Department of Agriculture, is “…the direct or intermediated marketing of food to consumers that is produced and distributed in a limited geographic area” (USDA). It is important to note that this definition can vary, and that guidelines on specific geographic boundaries differ based on state or region regulations. In relation to this article, local produce purchasing will refer to the attempt to purchase produce originating as close to the consumer’s home location as possible.

Why should anyone care about local produce?

We all know the produce we find in the store must be grown, but we may not all consider where it came from or how it got there. There’s not always an obvious need to think about those details when (for many Americans) finding produce is as simple as stopping by the grocery store and picking your preference. The ease and commonality of the process is less-than thought-provoking, but it must come from somewhere, right? The produce found in grocery stores must either be shipped, driven, or flown from where it was grown to wherever its consumption-fated destination may be. The distance between the two determines the unnecessary amount of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and hydrofluorocarbons that are released (EPA).

Some of the benefits that come from buying local produce include:

  • Reduced greenhouse gas emissions

The less transportation required in the journey from farm to table, the lower the amount of greenhouse gas emissions.

  • Stimulation of local economy

When consumers buy produce locally, it increases the likelihood that local farmers will be able to stay in business, especially if they are smaller and must compete against various larger farms from other areas.

  • Increased consumer consciousness

Understanding how food is grown and where it comes from encourages consumers to feel more connected with what they eat and aware of the food choices they make.

  • Fresher, more nutritious produce

Produce is the most nutritious directly after-harvest food that is not local is often harvested long before it reaches consumers, meaning that it is likely to be less nutrient-dense than local produce.

How can I find local food?

  • Grow your own garden

There is no safer way for a someone to guarantee that their produce is local than by growing it themselves.

  • Visit local farmer’s markets

Most cities have a farmer’s market where local farmers, growers, and crafters gather to sell their goods.

  • Visit county fairs/get to know farmers in the area

Similarly to farmer’s markets, county fairs are also an easy way to find local farmers and have the opportunity to speak to them about their practices.

  • Purchase produce that is in season

Different areas have different produce that is in season and available at different times, so learning what types of produce are supposed to be in season allows consumers another way to tell if they are buying locally.

How do I know what’s in season?

 Due to the wide variety of foods that can be consistently found in grocery stores, it is difficult to know what’s supposed to be in season and what’s not. The good news is, there’s an app for that! (https://www.seasonalfoodguide.org/download-app) The Seasonal Food Guide app and website allows users to search by area, time of year, and type of produce, providing a results list of produce that is in season near them.





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